Jan. 20, 2021

What Choice Should I Make with Jodi Hume

What Choice Should I Make with Jodi Hume

“I just really got in touch with how magnificently adaptable we are and how we can figure things out. Even if it doesn’t go fantastically, it’s good enough. So just jumping in and trying things became easier for me, because I just accidentally threw myself into those situations. I just feel like if you can trust that you’ll figure it out on the other side, it’ll get a little easier to jump in.” - Jodi Hume 

With the amount of decisions we all have to make daily in our personal and professional lives, the decision-making process can be challenging (to say the least). That is why I wanted to introduce you to today’s Brave By Design expert guest, as she is someone who works with busy leaders to facilitate decision making and has had great success in doing so. 

Jodi Hume is a personal strategist and facilitator for busy leaders and their teams. She facilitates the conversations that shape lives and businesses - with leadership, her clients’ loved ones, or in their own heads.

After a 15-year career as COO of a growing architecture firm, she now works with founders and leaders throughout the United States, Europe and Australia. Her career in senior management saw her firm move from local to national significance and increase nearly 400% in size. With every milestone came new decisions, opportunities and even more competing priorities to balance. 

Jodi has seen every stage of business development - from the startup challenges, to the growing pains, to the victories, and in this episode she reveals how the right way to approach decision-making. You’ll also learn what is really needed to be able to make solid decisions, and ones that you can be confident in. 

Connect with Jodi: http://www.leadingclarity.com/

Remember to hit SUBSCRIBE wherever you listen to podcasts!

Free webinar in late January for coaches, consultants and service-based businesses: Learn how Brave by Design became a Top 125 podcast and Laura gained new clients through podcasting. Register at podcastbrandlab.com

What You’ll Hear In This Episode: 

  • Ways to start “connecting the dots” and solving problems for yourself [1:26]

  • Jodi's idea of innate confidence, and why it’s such an important thing to possess [5:59]

  • The universal challenges she has identified in leaders that she has worked with in her career [9:47]

  • Why rest should be considered sacred, even in today’s fast-paced world [12:56]

  • Tips and strategies for battling the indecisiveness that we all face from time-to-time [21:39]

  • An exciting update on what Jodi has to offer in 2021 as part of her beta testing [29:34]

Additional Links & Resources:

Jodi’s Podcast

Traits of a Great Manager (Part 1 of 2) with Heidi Craun (Brave By Design)

Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/bravebydesign)

Transcript
Jodi Hume:

I just really got in touch with how like magnificently adaptable we are and how we can figure things out. And even if it doesn't go fantastically, it's good enough and it's better. So just jumping in and trying things became easier for me because I just accidentally threw myself into those situations. And I just feel like if you can trust that you'll figure it out on the other side, it gets a little easier to jump in.

Laura Khalil:

Welcome to brave by design. I'm your host, Laura Khalil. I'm an entrepreneur, coach and speaker. I love thinking bait, exploring the power of personal development and sharing the best strategies from thought leaders and pioneers in business to empower ambitious women and allies to bravely rise and thrive. Let's get started. Everyone, welcome to this episode of brave by design. I am so excited for you to meet our guest today. Jody Hume. She is a personal strategist and facilitator for busy leaders and their teams. She facilitates the conversations that shapes the lives and businesses of your leadership, your loved ones, and in your own head. And how many of us have conversations going on in our own head with a 15 year career as CEO of a growing architecture firm? Jody now works with founders and leaders across the globe. Jody Hill, welcome to brave by design.

Unknown:

Thank you for having me.

Laura Khalil:

So, you know, I just want to start off by asking you, you help people solve problems, as I understand it? Yeah. Yeah. I

Jodi Hume:

mean, it's I have one of I have created one of those those careers that's like, impossible to describe, it doesn't have a name. So if we're at a dinner party, and I'm just not up for it, I just say I'm a consultant.

Unknown:

You know, I just write problems for people.

Jodi Hume:

Yeah. But it definitely falls into that, you know, see a need philony kind of thing. And I grew up with entrepreneurs and those conversations and decisions, and there's so much uncertainty, and there's not a map and you need orienting skills more than a map. And so I just, I just my entire life has been kind of steeped in adaptive decision making. And that wasn't a career I planned. In fact, I will say nothing I get paid for right now. I even knew existed until I was at least 30. To 30. Really? Right. Yeah. Yeah. So I couldn't have plotted my course for this destination. If I tried. Wait. Okay.

Laura Khalil:

So Joanie, this is interesting. Because sometimes when people ask me what I do, I also hear you can kind of see their eyes sort of glaze over and they get like a little confused. And I'm really curious, how did you discover this path for yourself? Was there someone who came into your life that showed you this was possible or helped you

Jodi Hume:

a tiny bit, I mean, so so a friend of mine says, like, what you're here on earth to do is what you can't not do. And that, yes. As someone who absolutely got the job, he talks too much on her report card every single quarter. And then as you know, I stumbled into this job at the architecture firm, and I was the marketing person. And so that meant because I was the marketing person of a very small firm, I sat in on the weekly leadership team meetings every single Monday. And it was not my job to facilitate those meetings, I didn't even know facilitation existed as a thing that that was for probably 15 years after that. But again, what you can't not do, like my version of I see dead people is when people are talking. Like I see dots, I connect things I realize, I mean, there was a point, my first moment where I remember, facilitating per se, was one of the prints of their four owners of the company. One of them was talking about a project. Another one was talking about a person that worked for us. And they thought they made a decision. And I was like, whoa. And so those things where people think they understand and they don't know, where you're getting stuck on an issue and you're spinning your wheels, you're conflating a bunch of things together. And that's why it's hard. I mean, just this stack of things that I noticed in conversations just kept building up. And so as I, you know, took on all the other things far beyond marketing, they just wanted to be architects. So I got, I got to take on whatever I wanted, and I like to make things better. I mean, back to your question about solving problems. To me, it's all the same way. If you've ever done like it troubleshooting, like, if something doesn't work, first, you swap out the cable,

Unknown:

unplug it, plug it,

Jodi Hume:

plug it in, that's definitely a leadership technique right there. But you isolate the variables like yeah, the cable, you're like, Okay, it's not the cable, let's swap this out, then diagnostic separation of variables and like getting to the root cause of a thing is just something that I can't not but to point out, it took some facilitation classes, and that led me to coaching classes. And that set me on the path toward what I do now, which is somewhere between consulting and coaching and business therapy and a little, a few other things all mixed into one.

Laura Khalil:

That's awesome. And I love how you describe it as kind of like seeing the dots where other people can't see the connections and stuff. Sometimes it's really, as I found really critical to have someone who's a little bit outside of the situation who can be like, actually, it's easier than you think. Or there's something here that you're being blinded to just, you know, look left to right. TLDR we'll need a God in our lives, and

Jodi Hume:

God needs a god in her life. Let me just tell you there is no scarier than inside this brain right here. And I have had numerous people that when I try and like say my things and like, throw them out, not only to their eyes glaze over, but I actually had I was trying to hire a consultant one time and she paused, because I'm sorry, I just need a minute. I was like, Oh, are you taking? No, she goes, No, you're, you're exhausting. I don't think we're gonna work well. Like everybody needs someone who can watch them parallel park their car from outside of the car and let them know where the curb is, and where they have plenty of room. And they don't have to be so hesitant. And it's both it's you need to be able to have someone see all of it. So

Laura Khalil:

Jody is something that you've kind of talked around right now, but I think is really actually probably at the core of this is it takes a lot of courage to go into a meeting, let's say when you are working full time in this company, it takes a lot of courage to go into a meeting. And to be kind of, you're not one of the owners, you're a little bit on the outside, you may not have all the seniority, and to actually speak up and say, Hey, listen,

Jodi Hume:

did you fail that I didn't. And here's a really, I want to be super, super clear about this. I did not come back with some kind of like inherent confidence or something like that. It's more like a glitch in my operating system from a kid. But it's how I found confidence. And it's almost the opposite of how I've ever heard it talked about. And that is and I can tell you the super quick story that I remember. Is it Yeah. Second grade. My teacher might have been third grade my teacher holds up. I've been referring to it as a mimeograph, but I actually think it's a digital machine. That's how old I am.

Laura Khalil:

Okay, I'm sorry for God. What is that

Jodi Hume:

so that either mimeograph or ditto? I don't remember which one it is. But it was a way of like xeroxing. But pre xeroxing. Okay, maybe not pretty, but like else, and they were purple. And they were like, damp, that somehow it used water. Yes. I remember this Well, okay. So she held up one of those, does anybody know how to use the digital machine or whatever it was? And I said, I do. And she handed it to me. And I walked into the teacher's lounge. And I can tell you, I take like three steps into the teacher's lounge and have this like, I feel like, Oh, my God, I don't know how to use them. I don't even know which one is that machine. Like, I know nothing about how to use this thing. And here's the key thing.

Laura Khalil:

In that moment,

Jodi Hume:

I was far more terrified and mortified by the prospect of going back into the room and being like, actually,

Unknown:

I don't know what I'm doing.

Jodi Hume:

I don't know what I'm doing. Then I was I'm like, I'm gonna figure this out. And so I looked around. And you know, there was only one machine actually had one on there and short version, I figured it out. And I went back in. Now, that was not the moment where I had this huge Aha, but throughout my life, for reasons, I do not understand that, I'll do that, or I'll step in or whatever. And here's the thing, though, what I learned from that was not like I can do anything, because it didn't always work out, trust me. plenty of times, oh, that was a mess. But what I learned is, I just really got in touch with how like magnificently adaptable we are and how we can figure things out. And even if it doesn't go fantastically, it's good enough, and it's better. So just jumping in and trying things became easier for me, because I just accidentally threw myself into those situations. And I just feel like if you can trust that you'll figure it out on the other side, it gets a little easier to jump in. And the other sort of slight piece to it is I'm pretty add or you know, right now that I know for my kids being tested for things, and one of those things is impulse control and interrupting. And I have a really bad interrupting problem, to be honest. And so I went not when I'm facilitating and not what I'm coaching. But when I am participating in a meeting, I don't hesitate to jump in. And I I'm pretty sure that's why I've always done pretty well in male dominated industries because they jump in and they're fine with other people jumping in. If you just jump in and look like you know what you're doing. They're fine with it actually have

Laura Khalil:

the confidence of a white man.

Jodi Hume:

Again, it's not even competence. I don't I have an idea and it comes out my mouth.

Laura Khalil:

Jody, here's what I've learned. We are essentially the same person. And basically, I'm interviewing myself right now. So

Jodi Hume:

you just look at me and ask the question, and I'll just look at you and answer it.

Laura Khalil:

Got it. Got it. Did everyone get that? That silence there? That was it, it happened? So here's what I want to know. Because what I've come to appreciate and I'm sure what you've come to appreciate is that your skill and being able to figure out how to solve a problem or think about a problem differently. is actually really powerful. And it's not a skill that everyone learns at such a young age and integrates into their life. And so the first thing I want to ask is when you're working with leaders, do you see common challenges? Are there sort of universal challenges that maybe our listeners are experiencing that we can address?

Jodi Hume:

Oh, yeah, yeah, absolutely. And most of them, I feel like are this giant stack of advice that's terrible about leadership. And I think somehow along the way, we made these like societal agreements about some really bad advice for what it means what is

Laura Khalil:

the worst advice?

Jodi Hume:

So yeah, I've got I've got a few of them, actually. But some of the worst ones, I've a real, whatever that is in your craw, whatever that expression is, I can't think what it is about the whole concept of of hustle and really like plowing through things. It's absolutely important you my clients often joke because a great portion of my best advice is like two opposite things at the exact same time. Like you can't like obviously, leaders and entrepreneurs especially have to have this like drive. And this like intense drive to make things better to be the master of your own destiny to like plow for where I go and it takes you often are burning the candles at both ends, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. But I'm here to tell you that if you really want to run your business into the ground or your department into the ground, let yourself get overrun, overworked, overwhelmed, depleted, I have a lot of the work I do is on call decision support, and a great deal of the time when people call me yes, sometimes there's a decision to be made. And there are variables to sort through and strategy to think about or whatever, a huge portion of the time need a nap. They are well exhausted and honest to God, if I said Do you want a hamburger cheeseburger, I don't think they'd be able to decide because they are just, they're tired. And, and this isn't like smushy self care. This is neuroscience, straight out of like Journal of Medicine use your brain needs to be able to make nuanced decisions. Now you can make fight or flight decisions if you are exhausted. But you cannot make really high level strategy, nuanced thought processes. If you are exhausted, your brain literally doesn't have the fuel for it. So I'm a big fan of strategic hooky and knowing when to take yourself offline. And give yourself an afternoon a day even a couple of days. And the worst part is usually when that is the smartest thing you can do is when it seems like the last exhaustible thing you could even contemplate doing. And but it is. So that's that's one of my big, big things is make sure you're rested.

Laura Khalil:

You know, there is sort of an interesting movement right now there's something on Instagram called I think it's called like the nap ministry or something. And they talk about rest as a form of resistance to societal norms and the hustle culture and like how rest is, is really one of like, the most sacred things you can do for yourself. And we don't do it because we glorify especially in the United States. This hustle this go this push grind it out and Yeah, sometimes you do need to grind but like give yourself a frickin break.

Jodi Hume:

Well, and if you think about me the evidence on every in every single industry and every single I mean take everything from Olympic athletes to top notch violinists, you know, like, like, world renowned violinists to everything in the world. Sleeping, nobody trains the last week of the Olympics, let you know to run themselves into the ground, they rent lashes, they do all these like violinists like they sleep a ton. It is not the value that we put on like hustle and running yourself into the ground that literally sits with like back when people thought the world was flat. We are just ignoring the summer I say back when but

Laura Khalil:

we're, you know, it's that work God, you know, you never know.

Jodi Hume:

Like, exactly. So there's so much science about what needs to happen for your brain to be in its top notch state and we just kind of ignore it. So So keeping yourself not depleted at the very least if not well rested is one of the most important things I think people can do. But the real one that gets me the most up in arms is I don't know who made up like it's lonely at the top. But if it is lonely at the top, you are doing it wrong and your company at risk, and you're putting everything on the line, if it is lonely at the top, you need to be supported. You do and and that's the that's the funny thing. I had this one client say to me one time, it's just it's really hard for me to ask for help. I said, I was like, I want you to pause and think about that for a second. Because leadership is literally a job of like coordinating help. That's what writing is like there is no vert if you're doing it all yourself. You're not a leader. You're an individual contributor, and

Laura Khalil:

that's right, not your job. Your job is to inspire And to coordinate and motivate a giant pile of help. And so just sort of feeling like you have to do it yourself that you have to have all the answers and that you can't talk to other people is just the stupidest thing ever. Well, you know, totally, and the research bears that out. So a lot of the work that I do is around helping women rise into leadership. And one of the things we know from the research is that when you over specialize in one area of your career, let's say because you think that's gonna get me a seat at the table is to be the real expert in this one domain, you actually shove yourself into a corner. And what we know is that all great leaders know that they're not necessarily the best at everything in the organization, but they know how to get help from people who are better than them. And so, for ladies, if you're listening to this, this is just a different angle on the advice that I often share view of don't get yourself backed into a corner where you only do one thing, learn to ask for help learn to surround yourself with a tribe who's smarter than you that's more advanced than you that knows different things than you that can help broaden your whole portfolio, your whole depth of awareness. When I started brave by design a year ago, I had no idea that it would actually help me build multiple revenue streams for my business. If you are a coach, consultant, or service provider who loves podcasting, and wants to learn how I got brave by design into the top 125 career podcasts, built five figures of revenue from the podcast and grew my brand. I'm offering a free webinar later this January, head on over to podcast brand lab.com. For all the details. That's podcast brand lab.com.

Jodi Hume:

No, for sure. No, I think that's super important. And I think I think it's especially complicated for women, be in the workplace, sometimes asking for help, because we're, I mean, I think anytime you feel like you have something to prove, it gets learn to ask for help. And I see that with my guy clients, too, the more they are in touch with their imposter syndrome, the more they are nervous about asking for help, because they feel they have incorrectly assumed that the way that they do their job well is to show up with all the answers. And it takes some courage, but real leadership comes with the questions and being like stupidly curious, not not even pretending, you know, but then like, okay, what's that? Like? What do you think? What do you suggest and rapping other people into it is and you're making use of your leadership team, you know, the team of people, right? Hello, you to lift everything all up? That means not having the answers. And it's much easier, like,

Laura Khalil:

seriously make it obviously.

Jodi Hume:

And if people are involved in making the decisions, then you don't have less issues with buying. Do you know the word facilitate actually translate not translates to it's not a different

Laura Khalil:

the origin or something?

Jodi Hume:

Yeah, the definition of facilitate is to make easier. And because faasil

Laura Khalil:

in French is easy.

Unknown:

Yeah, there. Yeah.

Laura Khalil:

That's a fun note. I speak French on the site. So I'm like, Oh, that makes a lot of sense.

Jodi Hume:

Yeah. So facilitate means to make easier. And so I often just think of leadership as facilitation, you're not there. It's not a performance job, it is a facilitation job to make things easier.

Laura Khalil:

And you know, God, that's a great point, we did in one of our very first episodes, we did the traits of a great manager. And it's one of the most popular episodes we've ever done. And one of the things that our guests said to your point is she said, The job of a great manager or leader is not to carry the stick with the carrot on the end of it. But it is to coach it is to inspire. And it's really to help the employees unlock those barriers and find ways to be successful. And I'm hearing that again, from you. It's like, that's what great leadership is all about.

Jodi Hume:

Yeah, no, it is it and it and that's why I feel like leadership is hard. It's absolutely hard, especially right now because you have to. I mean, it has always been the case. But more than ever, you have to be looking like out into the future. But then also looking right down at your feet and everything in between and you you're constantly having to course correct. But that is actually the core point here. And it ties into every single thing we've talked about all the way back to my ditto machine store. Which is that just the whole concept of confidence is bogus, in my mind. Like I just I don't think that confidence is like you're reaching for something that is never there. I I can tell you right now, I hear the private, vulnerable conversations of people who run like $300 million companies sometimes. They don't know what they're doing. They still don't know what they're doing. They're still unsure themselves like it never happens. You're never like out Got this all under control. If

Laura Khalil:

moments are bad, there's never a moment where you're like, I've got it figured out, I'm done. It's just move to the next level. And you're like, oh, now shoot, I'm scared. Yes,

Jodi Hume:

yeah. And even more scared, because now there's more on the line and more people are watching every move you make. And every little decision you make comes with even more issues. And oh, and guess what? Nobody tells you, you're doing a good job, because they just assume you know that. And if nobody gives you good feedback, because if they do, you can't necessarily trust it. Because you're like, Are you telling me that just because we know it gets scarier as you go up. So if you just sort of ignore, learn to kind of ignore that and be like, well, it's always going to feel this way. So I might as well just keep going. Because here's the cool thing. And I have validated this, this is actually true. The space shuttle is never actually on course, I don't know if you've ever actually heard Oh, the only way they can ever get it anywhere, is they're constantly course correcting it. So they like it to the left. And they like it to the right. And so at no point is it ever actually on track, their only way to do anything is to adjust as they go. And that's life folks. Like the only way to do anything. trouble adjusting. Yeah, get comfortable adjusting. There is no like dude to do to do to do him walking down the path. And it's

Laura Khalil:

always Jody here. I am sorry to interrupt you, because I feel like you also have a career as a special effects person.

Unknown:

I will keep that in mind, I will keep that in

Laura Khalil:

mind. I've been I've been listening to your special effects is upset unlike her. She's amazing. And that is great advice. So let me ask you this, there's probably people listening who are thinking, Okay, course correcting, you know, I may not get all of the external recognition or feedback that I'm doing the right thing. But for people who are literally experiencing analysis paralysis, about is it a or is it B? What can you recommend to them?

Jodi Hume:

So here's the simplest and this is the really funny thing. I mean, I think this happens for a lot of people. There is no one in the world who can be more indecisive than Jody who like, I like right now on my own. But that is why I have an entire like, like, there's a couple people I joke are kind of my Seeing Eye dogs of that, because I know I have coping mechanisms for my indecisive ness, because I am so prone to it. So I feel Yeah. Here's wisdom that was actually given to my sister one time. And then I have a couple other thoughts. But this one has saved me many, many, many times. And we were standing in a store and I was trying to decide between these two things to buy for our mom. And I was like, oh, but this one's that one. And that one's that one. And this is that. And my sister who was getting frustrated said, you know, if it's that hard to decide between the two, then it probably doesn't matter.

Laura Khalil:

Oh, sorry, did we just feel the mic drop. And Jody actually gave us the sound effects for it as well. I know, wow, oh, man, probably doesn't matter. Like

Jodi Hume:

if they're that hard to decide between, and you're probably good. Now, obviously, at huge scale, or like there are issues for which that is not helpful advice, like I will tell you right now. But for a great number of things. If they are that hard to pick between, then they're probably then either one is probably fine, and just get into action and adjust from there. Also another piece to it. And this is a really, really important one to keep in mind, for some reason. And I think this is a glitch in the human operating system somewhere. Because I don't think we actually think this is true, but we act as if this belief that we get like one decision. And then it's almost like we imagine we're one of those like waterslides, where you climb the 12 stories, and then you have to get in either the green one or the blue one, and to move through, you know, and you end up at the bottom and you get no further choices after that. Ah, and the fact of the matter is, that's not how life works. And and if you can really back up from it, when you are feeling analysis, paralysis about something getting really more grounded and clear in the realization that in most situations, this is just the first decision. And then the minute you walk through one of those doors, you will then have other decisions, including in many, many cases to walk back through the one you just came through and choose the other one if you do the wrong thing. And so yeah, not imagining that this is your final decision that will then decide everything else in the world for you forever, which I know it sounds dramatic, but you're absolutely right.

Laura Khalil:

That's how you know God. That is such a great piece of advice. When I remember when I started consulting, I had been in the full time world I started consulting in 2013. And I became I was like one of those people who was like, Oh my gosh, should I leave? Should I leave this company? Should I start my own business? What should I do? And I and I've had friends who spun around that over and over and over. And you know this and I know this the minute you start your own business That is literally the smallest decision you're going to make. Because there's about four bazillion other things coming and people don't realize that they think that's the big decision. I'm like, Girl No,

Jodi Hume:

no, don't have any idea. You have no idea. That's like saying like the big decision is whether to have a child or not. You're like, Oh,

Unknown:

that's one of the big decisions like, right.

Jodi Hume:

And then everything else from there. Yeah, I keep myself grounded in that when I don't have the people that I reach out to, to talk things through with for whatever reason, I just always imagined myself when I met, you know, if I'm at a restaurant where they don't just have a one simple menu, good. God forbid you take me to a Denny's or something I could, for many reasons, because, but, but you know, it's like the 32 page menu, I don't like 32 pages of choices, and I will get all paralyzed, like, Do I want this to I went, and I have this little mantra like God, it's not your last meal. That's really your last meal. Just pick something you can eat again another day. And so I use that in things outside of being at restaurants and like, okay, it's not your last meal. And move forward. Just try it. Because I mean, not to be not to take it in a dramatic turn. But here's the thing like time is the resource that we cannot get back. And when you are wasting time spinning wheels, or worse, like people tend to fall into one or two categories, they their spin wheels, or they second guess both aren't very useful. So you're not

Laura Khalil:

doing anything? No,

Jodi Hume:

no. And so just taking action, if something stinks, undo it, or go in a different direction, do something different. You know, you can keep making choices, but wasting time is the one thing that I I just I really try to have a zero tolerance policy for different by the way. I said that one time and someone's like, Well, yeah, but you just talked about like taking time off and blah, blah. I was like, What makes you think I classify that as wasting time? I consider that investing time. Yes. In my brain. I actually watched this happen by the way, like I've quantitative evidence of why it's important to play hooky sometimes. And I was super this past summer, I was just run into the ground. And I could feel that and we tried to do this vacation. But it I don't have to tell you that. It just wasn't it didn't do the job. It wasn't were stretched. It was not restored if I needed another couple days, and I just I didn't feel reset and I but I'd been gone a week. So I came back. I worked on Monday wasn't feeling it friend called me to go for a hike on Tuesday morning. And I didn't have any appointments. But I had a lot of stuff to do. And I've been gone a week and I was like, Yeah, I can't He's like, come on. It's like it's only going to be nice today. And it's going to rain for like 10 days. I was like Fine, I'll go. So we went. And I love taking pictures, I take millions of pictures on my phone. And I got home after our hike was a three hour hike. And I looked back at my pictures. And it's so interesting. So the first hour and a half of the hike, there are two pictures. And they look as if someone said while you're out there, you are required to take a picture of trees twice. They're the most boring like they're they're just I don't even know why I took them like apps. And then about halfway through the hike, I start taking some pictures. The last third of the hike, I probably took like 80 pictures. And they are some of my favorite most like there's so interesting. And it is not because the forest got more interesting in the last hour of the hike. It was as I looked at my camera roll, it's like I was watching my brain going from this watered up ball of paper. And then watching it just like unfold back into its natural shape. And the remainder of that week, I got more not only to get more done, because it's not just about production. Like I had ideas. I hadn't had any ages, like I strategized a whole project that I'm now like that maybe my like, 2021, big girl, it poured out to me that and that's because your brain requires alpha waves, which are relaxation waves. If it doesn't have those waves, it can't find its way to those parts of the brain, you really, really need to do your best work.

Laura Khalil:

Oh my gosh, ladies and gentlemen, are you not totally in love with God? Like, I just I just want to put it in my pocket.

Jodi Hume:

I gotta tell you, I'm pretty certain like I could talk to you all the time. Like, maybe we should have a show together.

Laura Khalil:

I never should Jodi and I answer all kinds of problems. And it's essentially the same advice because we're the same person. But no, Jodi, this was so awesome. to have you on brave by design, I really want to thank you for sharing your wisdom. It's very grounded. And I think that people are going to get a lot of benefit out of this. And I want them to be able to connect with you. So where can people go to learn more about Jodi here.

Jodi Hume:

So there's one little page I made that you can get there by going to leading clarity calm and there you can find a bunch of different things, you can find a link to my show that I do with my colleague Elliot each week called so here's my story. So if you want to listen and subscribe, you can do that there. But I also made something available there that I only make available on these interviews that I do, in part because I'm making testing, and I'm keeping really small. But this not being lonely in the business issues that you have is something this is part of that 2021 thing I was talking about. I feel really strongly about it. And there's this Seth Godin quote that says, if you have a problem you can't talk about, now you have two problems. God, every thing in my work is about not having that second problem. So there's a link there where you can actually get 20 minutes on my calendar to just talk through, I'm gonna be super clear, not only is this not a sales call, but if you're interested in finding out about how I work, I will not discuss it with you. And we have a different time, I want that to be really cleanly clear. This is not one of those hop on a call with me, and then I'm going to sell you

Laura Khalil:

it's like a hard sell. And we're like, what,

Jodi Hume:

what is it this is like this is Yeah, this is the opposite of a hard sell. I won't discuss it there. So but I just if someone has things, they business things, especially they can't talk through with any way they don't. And someone I want them to get a taste of that, for my benefit of that is I am testing these, what I'm working on is this asynchronous, tiny snippets, I really have this thing about coaching and consulting. And also therapy being these like big things that like I'm going to hire a coach. And it's this decision, and it's heavy, and you have to work together for months. And I think people need quick snippets of talking to thing through and getting clear and moving on and going back to their business. And I

Laura Khalil:

love that that's actually pretty revolutionary in terms of coaching models,

Jodi Hume:

that so everything I do now is on call 100% really 100% and I want to make it, I want to make it more, I'm playing around with how to do the model so that it can be something people can just like, grab a quick snippet of haven't quite worked out how that works from a, you know, the model

Laura Khalil:

finance and

Jodi Hume:

yeah, because then there's a bunch of, you know, whatever we'd have to get Yes, I'm just making it so that the buying decision feels right size so that people will do it. And they'll do and it won't feel like you're calling your lawyer like, Oh, I'm gonna get a bill for that. So I get to work on the pieces, but I have no lack of confidence about the need for it. So testing out like, Can I talk to somebody I've never talked to and be helpful in 20 or 30 minutes, like I'm playing around with that kind of level of stuff?

Laura Khalil:

Well, I really have no doubt that you can be because we've been talking for just over 30 minutes. And this has been even for me personally, a very enlightening session with you recording with you. And I've just so appreciated it. So I want to thank you again for joining us on the show. Thanks for having me anytime. I want to thank you for joining me and remember to subscribe to your favorite app so you can stay up to date, and I would love your review. If you've enjoyed this episode. Please leave a review and comment on Apple podcasts. You can also keep in touch with me online. You can find me on LinkedIn and I'm also on Instagram at force of badassery. All that information will be available in the show notes. Until next time, stay brave